24-26 October 2018
Han-sur-Lesse
Europe/Brussels timezone
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Contribution List

Displaying 44 contributions out of 44
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2.2
A campaign of paleoseismological investigations was performed on the nearly 22 km-long coseismic surface rupture of the 30 October 2016 Mw 6.5 normal-faulting earthquake in Central Apennines. The main goal was the definition of the maximum magnitude, the average rate of displacement and the frequency of seismic events on the Mt. Vettore-Mt. Bove fault system (VBFS hereinafter). We show the results ... More
Presented by Dr. Daniela PANTOSTI on 25 Oct 2018 at 09:00
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 3 Posters
Archaeoseismology investigates the characteristics of past earthquakes on the basis of the observed and recorded damages on historical buildings or archaeological remains. To better achieve this scope, an important step might be the setup of the numerical modelling of past structures. Indeed, the seismic response of a building is intrinsically related to its geometry and mechanical properties, so ... More
Presented by Mr. arnaud MONTABERT on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Keynote Session: Session 1
Large earthquakes within stable continental regions (SCR) show that significant amounts of elastic strain can be released on geological structures far from plate boundary faults, where the vast majority of the Earth’s seismic activity takes place. SCR earthquakes show spatial and temporal patterns that differ from those at plate boundaries and occur in regions where tectonic loading rates are ne ... More
Presented by Dr. Eric CALAIS on 24 Oct 2018 at 10:00
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2
The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) is the central part of the Central European Cenozoic Rift System (ECRIS) and one of the tectonically active regions in Europe. The URG extends from the Jura thrust and fold belt in the South near Basle city (Switzerland) to the Rhenish Massif in the North near Frankfurt and is limited by sinistral strike-slip faults on either sides. Several studies suggested particular ... More
Presented by Prof. Klaus REICHERTER on 24 Oct 2018 at 17:10
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 1 Posters
We report on the installation and maintenance of professional-grade seismic stations by amateurs in Berloz (Belgium) and Oostburg (Zeeland, The Netherlands) and the usefulness of the data provided by their stations.
Presented by Daniel WILKIN on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 4
In the extensive parts of the Niedźwiedzia Cave in Kletno discovered in 2011-2013, several dozen broken and fallen stalagmites, stalactites and flowstones have been documented, the largest of which are nearly 0.6 m in diameter and ~ 2 m in height. Damaged speleothems can be observed in the whole cave, as well as collapses of thickness up to several meters. In order to decipher the causes of these ... More
Presented by Dr. Jacek SZCZYGIEŁ on 25 Oct 2018 at 14:00
Type: Keynote Session: Session 3
Due to its particular geological context, the town of Pompeii and its surroundings are an exceptional ‘laboratory’, subject to a double volcanic and seismic risk. It stands out as it wasthe victim of two earthquakes before the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The first, in 63 AD is well known because it is recorded in the texts of Seneca and Tacitus, while the second, which happened around the y ... More
Presented by Dr. Hélène DESSALES on 25 Oct 2018 at 13:00
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 3 Posters
Leydecker's (2011) catalogue lists merely two historical earthquakes between 800 AD and 1499 AD in the northern part of the Rheingraben. Archaeoseismological evidence is provided for several damaging earthquakes during Roman times and the Middle Ages. The Roman villa at Ahrweiler was buried by mudflow. Before 400 AD an earthquake caused liquefaction, which yielded subsidence of floors and wall ... More
Presented by Mr. Miklos KAZMER on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 3
In South America, human beings are prone to settle along fault scarps. Emblematic among them in Peru, the touristic and tectonic Cuzco region is affected by damaging earthquakes since the Spaniards arrived, as demonstrated by the 1650, 1950 and 1985 events. This area in the high Altiplano, sitting 400km away from the subduction zone, exhibits a combination of strong seismic hazard and high vulnera ... More
Presented by Laurence AUDIN on 25 Oct 2018 at 13:40
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2.2
The subduction margin of the Central Andes is characterized by the occurrence of large earthquakes associated with the convergence of the Nazca and South American Plates at about 6.5-7.0 cm/yr (DeMets et al., 1994; Angermann et al., 1999; Béjar-Pizarro et al., 2010). This convergence rate is responsible for causing giant tsunamigenic subduction earthquakes like the 1868 Mw 8.8 and 1877 Mw 8.8 eve ... More
Presented by Prof. diego SALAZAR on 25 Oct 2018 at 09:20
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 4
Paleospeleosismology is a discipline, which studies fallen stalagmites and stalactite as archives of past seismic events (Quinif, 1996; Gilli, 2005). Damaged or fallen speleothems (named seismothems) are often observed in caves, and first recognized at Han-sur-Lesse karst complex. There are several physical causes that can damage or break stalagmites: one is the reaction of the stalagmite – as a ... More
Presented by Prof. Víctor-Hugo GARDUÑO-MONROY on 25 Oct 2018 at 15:30
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 2 Posters
Marine tsunamis have been increasingly discussed in the context of ocean-wide natural hazards since the 2004 Sumatra and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunamis. While ocean tsunamis are usually caused by earthquake-related plate displacements, tsunamis in lakes can have a seismic or aseismic cause. The wave-causing mechanisms are usually related to mass-movement processes that displace large amounts ... More
Presented by Katrina KREMER on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 1 Posters
The practice of macroseismic investigation through internet inquiries is well established among numerous seismological institutions around the world, thanks to wide citizen participation. Although internet macroseismic data analysis has reached high levels in Europe, intensity methods adopted by each one of the national research institutes are still quite different and usually tailored to the need ... More
Presented by Dr. Koen VAN NOTEN on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 4
Stalagmites can provide very high-resolution (seasonal to annual) continental archives for paleoenvironmental reconstructions (Bar-Matthews et al, 1991, Bar-Matthews et al, 1997) due to their precise chronology and their ability to register climatic and environmental changes through proxy-tools such as stable isotopes \delta ^{13}C and \delta ^{18}O (McDermott, 2004) and trace elements (Fairchild ... More
Presented by Prof. Daniele PINTI on 25 Oct 2018 at 16:10
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 4 Posters
Seismic activity has been instrumentally recorded in the Central Western Carpathians, both in Slovakia and Poland. Many earthquakes were registered in ancient written sources, such as chronicles. Compilation of instrumental data and historical sources shows that epicenters of earthquakes are clustered in zones, which is an expression of the regional faults pattern. Several seismically active zones ... More
Presented by Dr. Jacek SZCZYGIEŁ, Wojciech WROBLEWSKI on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 1 Posters
Earthquake catalogue for the XIXth century from the Lower Rhine Embayment to the North Sea: summary and results. Knuts Elisabeth (1), Camelbeeck Thierry (1), Hinzen Klaus-G. (2), Dost Bernard (3) and Pierre Alexandre (1) (1) Royal Observatory of Belgium (2) Seismological Station Bensberg, Cologne University (3) Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) The Royal Observatory of Be ... More
Presented by Ms. Elisabeth KNUTS on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Keynote Session: Session 3
Earthquakes cause ground motions and ground motions can cause damage to engineered structures. Engineering seismology’s main goal is to design structures that withstand such ground motions. Models for simulating ground motions, given that the seismic source and the travel path parameters can be assumed or are known, can be constructed which can help quantify damage scenarios. By applying a varie ... More
Presented by Prof. Klaus-G. HINZEN on 25 Oct 2018 at 11:00
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 4
Track: Session 4 Orals
The relations between the karstification and the sismotectonic events can be divided in two great chapters. (1) During karstogenesis, there are relations between tectonic conditions and possibility of karstogenesis. (2) After active evolution of endokarst, we can use the geometry of the endokarstic features and the endokarstic deposits to characterize and date the sismotectonic phenomena. I. Ka ... More
Presented by Prof. Yves QUINIF on 25 Oct 2018 at 14:20
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 4
Earthquakes hit urban centers in Europe infrequently, but occasionally with disastrous effects. Obtaining an unbiased view of seismic hazard (and risk) is therefore very important. In principle, the best way to test Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessments (PSHA) is to compare them with observations that are entirely independent of the procedure used to produce PSHA models. Arguably, the mos ... More
Presented by Dr. Katalin GRIBOVSZKI on 25 Oct 2018 at 14:40
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 2 Posters
Last Glacial fluvial sequences in the Paris Basin show laminated lacustrine deposits OSL and radiocarbon dated to between 24.6 and 16.6 ka in one site and overlying alluvial sandy gravel. A thermokarst origin of the lakes is sup- ported by abundant traces of ground ice, particularly ice wedge pseudomorphs beneath the lacustrine layers and synsedimentary deformation caused by thaw settlement. The f ... More
Presented by Mr. Kevin MANCHUEL on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 2 Posters
The Asian plate interiors are known to have host strong earthquakes with magnitudes up to M≈8 in recent history, especially around the border area between Mongolia, Kazakhstan, China and Russia (e.g., M7.3 Chuya earthquake, 2003). Their recurrence times seem to be long, because of the relative low slip rates (less than 1 mm/y) of the faults which caused them. In this study, we focus on a large ... More
Presented by Mr. Stéphane BAIZE on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 2 Posters
We analysed morphologically pronounced, NNW-SSE trending Mariánské Lázně Fault (MLF) situated in the western part of the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic, central Europe). The MLF controls the eastern limit of Cheb-Domažlice Graben. In the northern part it borders the Cenozoic Cheb basin towards mountain front of Krušné hory Mts and intersects with NE-trending Cenozoic Eger rift. The Cheb ba ... More
Presented by Dr. Petra ŠTĚPANČÍKOVÁ on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 3
Track: Session 3 Orals
The completion of version 2.1 of the magnitude-oriented earthquake catalogue for German and adjacent areas EKDAG - extended Ahorner catalogue (as of December 2014) gave rise to the question of the influence of current catalogue entries (or their changes) and the hazard analyses highlighting them on practical engineering applications. This question was fundamentally extended to the question of the ... More
Presented by Dr. Silke BEINERSDORF on 25 Oct 2018 at 11:40
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 1
Track: Session 1 Orals
Reliable seismic hazard analysis is based on good quality data and models of the distribution of earthquakes in terms of time, space and size and the underlying processes that can explain this distribution. To improve the basis in Germany present work coordinated by BGR focuses on the earthquake catalogue, the paleoseismological database, the database of active faults and a seismotectonic source z ... More
Presented by Dr. Diethelm KAISER on 24 Oct 2018 at 11:10
on 24 Oct 2018 at 09:30
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2
The Issyk-Kul intermountain depression has a border with the Terskey Ala-Too Range in the south. Formation of these structures of the Tien Shan goes in conditions of the continental compression caused by a collision of Eurasian and India lithosphere plates. In the south a contact of the depression and mountains goes along Pre-Terskey Border Fault. Structure of this fault is a complicated system ... More
Presented by Dr. Andrey KORZHENKOV on 24 Oct 2018 at 16:50
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 1
The 2018 seismic sequence of Mayotte began the 10 May at 50-60 km east from the island and Mamoudzou (most important city of Mayotte with approximately 70000 inhabitants) with earthquakes of magnitude 3 – 4. The major event with a magnitude of 5.7 (BRGM) took place 5 days after (Mw 5,8-5,9 USGS), preceded the day before by a magnitude 5.2. Until the 15 June (period considered in the study of BCS ... More
Presented by Christophe SIRA on 24 Oct 2018 at 12:10
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 1
Magnitude estimates of earthquakes occurred before the instrumental period are a key issue in seismic hazard assessment. For such earthquakes, the only information available is provided by historical sources. These are first translated into macroseismic intensity by means of intensity scales and then intensities are used to estimate earthquake parameters such as epicentral intensity, magnitude and ... More
Presented by Mrs. Ludmila PROVOST on 24 Oct 2018 at 14:20
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 1
There is a wide consensus on the magnitude, Ms5.4, of the Fennoscandian earthquake on 23 October 1904, which makes it the largest onshore/nearshore event in the region during the 1900s. In much of the available literature it is known as the Oslofjord earthquake. An earthquake of this magnitude is rare in the Fennoscandian Shield, so it is meaningful to extract all possible information about it. ... More
Presented by Dr. Päivi MÄNTYNIEMI on 24 Oct 2018 at 11:50
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 1
Different geo-hazards are investigated in the framework of the German-Bangladesh technical cooperation project: “Geo Information for Urban Planning and Adaptation to Climate Change (GPAC)". Seismic hazard assessment is one focus of the project. Bangladesh is located close to the boundaries of the complex convergence of Indian and Eurasian plates to the north and to the east. These collision and ... More
Presented by Dr. Aida AZARI SISI on 24 Oct 2018 at 14:40
Type: Keynote Session: Session 2
The North and East Anatolian Faults in Turkey are two large conjugate strike-slip faults characterized by earthquakes of magnitude equal or larger than 7 and creep, which makes it difficult to evaluate their long-term seismic activity and the related seismic hazard. The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) ruptured from east to west in a westward propagating sequence of M> 7 earthquakes since 1939 and is ... More
Presented by Mrs. Aurelia HUBERT-FERRARI on 24 Oct 2018 at 15:20
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 2 Posters
Contemporaneous mass transport deposits (MTDs) recorded in high-resolution sediment archives provide evidence of past seismic shaking. However, because they usually cannot be linked directly to a fault rupture, assessment of the earthquake source (location and magnitude or specific fault) based on this type of indirect paleoseismological evidence remains difficult. Based on observations of coseism ... More
Presented by Dr. Kris VANNESTE on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 3 Posters
The Oaxaca valley was one of the sites with more development in prehispanic cultures, highlighting Monte Alban that has been the most important site of the Zapotec culture. However, this great advance in Mesoamerica, the geological scenario makes the Oaxaca state is vulnerable with seismic activity, as the recent earthquakes of 2017 (Mw8.2) and 2018 (Mw7.2) showed. In the past, different events ha ... More
Presented by Prof. Víctor Hugo GARDUÑO-MONROY on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2
Geomorphic indices are widely used to quantitatively appraise relative tectonic activity. Extensive, uncomplicated and nearly unlimited access to digital elevation models and GIS software essentially sustained the worldwide usage of those indices. Even though they can provide valuable information on active tectonics from landforms, the obtained data should be always corroborated in the field. Mo ... More
Presented by Dr. Krzysztof GAIDZIK on 24 Oct 2018 at 16:30
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 4 Posters
Soft sediment deformation were recognized within poorly-lithified Upper Pleistocene siliciclastic deposits, filling one of the cave passage in Kalacka Cave in Tatra Mts (southern Poland). Structural analysis revealed that soft sediment deformations are represented by micro faults and micro folds (disharmonic folds, fault-bend folds, upright anticlines), water escape structures, and load structures ... More
Presented by Dr. Wojciech WROBLEWSKI on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 1
Remo Grolimund, Evelyn Boesch, Donat Fäh Swiss Seismological Service, ETH Zurich ETH University Archives, ETH Zurich **Seismicity in Switzerland in the early instrumental period Re-assessment of the period 1911-1963 from a heterogeneous dataset** After the compilation of the Swiss Earthquake Catalogue ECOS-091 the next logical step in the process of improving his¬torical earthquake inf ... More
Presented by Mr. Remo GROLIMUND on 24 Oct 2018 at 11:30
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 2 Posters
The historic 1692 Verviers Earthquake (Ms 6-6.3) represents one of the most significant events in NW Europe, with its supposed epicentral area being located along the Hockai Fault Zone (HFZ) in East Belgium. This, and other seismic events in the past, characterises the 42 km long HFZ as a seismically active zone of multiple fault segments, which also crosses the entire Stavelot Massif. In this wor ... More
Presented by Mrs. Anne-Sophie MREYEN on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 4
The two most recent collapses in the Han-sur-Lesse Cave (Belgian Ardenne), more precisely in the Dôme room, occurred on or shortly after 3rd December 1828 and between the 13th and 14th of March 1984. These collapses were directly observed by cave guides and occurred less than a year after the 23rd February 1828 (Mw =5.1 in Central Belgium) and 8th November 1983 (Mw=4.8 in Liège) earthquakes, ... More
Presented by Dr. Sophie VERHEYDEN on 25 Oct 2018 at 15:50
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2.2
Fault displacement and Seismic hazard analyses employ empirical relationships to predict potential earthquake magnitude ("scaling relationships"; e. g., Wells and Coppersmith, 1994), surface slip), probability functions of surface rupture and surface slip amount (e. g., “conditional probability of rupture” and "probability of exceedance", respectively; see Youngs et al; 2003). Those relationsh ... More
Presented by Mr. Stéphane BAIZE on 25 Oct 2018 at 08:40
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2.2
The north-western Alps foreland (Jura Mountains) is considered as still experiencing distal effects of the Alpine collision, resulting in a moderate but significant seismicity. This study focuses on the Culoz strike slip fault, developing from the Jura Mountains to the West, to the Chautagne swamp and through Lake Le Bourget to the East. Because erosion and anthropogenic activities erased most of ... More
Presented by Dr. Hervé JOMARD on 25 Oct 2018 at 09:40
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 1
Track: Session 1 Orals
The seismicity of Eastern Europe before the 15th century is not well known because historical sour¬ces (annals, chronicles, etc.) are missing, except in Russia. Numerous claimed earthquakes in traditional com¬pilations were demonstrated as late forgeries in the study of Pierre and Dominique Alexandre (2012). The first well known general shock is the one of June 5th, 1443. The former work of ... More
Presented by Dr. Pierre ALEXANDRE on 24 Oct 2018 at 15:00
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 2.2
Earthquake hazard models are based on data from the instrumental and historical records. However, in regions where deformation rates are low, the recurrence rate of large earthquakes may exceed the timescale covered by these datasets. Thus, it is crucial to collect paleoseismological information over longer timescales. In Switzerland, a considerable number of studies has been performed gathering i ... More
Presented by Katrina KREMER on 25 Oct 2018 at 10:00
Type: Poster Preference Session: Poster Session 1
Track: Session 1 Posters
Seismic risk assessment in intraplate regions with low surface deformation, such as Northeastern France, and its border countries of Germany and Switzerland, faces important challenges related to vulnerability due to the : high density of population, numerous industries with sensitive activities (nuclear power plants, mines, quarry blasting, chemical and bacteriological industries), and fragil ... More
Presented by Alexandra RENOUARD on 24 Oct 2018 at 13:45
Type: Oral Preference Session: Session 3
Track: Session 3 Orals
There is more in archaeoseismology than just a good story - wrote Manuel Sintubin and co-authors back in 2008 (SRL 79). Observations abound, get published, interpreted and various conclusions are drawn, more or less well-founded. However, due to the nature of excavations and restorations valuable information is lost if not documented properly and in time. Much information is lost due to the fact t ... More
Presented by Mr. Miklos KAZMER on 25 Oct 2018 at 12:00